Our Sacred Mountain Home
Art Exhibition

  July 24, 2019 — August 14, 2019

Program Fee: FREE!


What is mountain culture? Why have people throughout time been compelled to live, explore and pray in the mountains? This exhibit features local artists exploring their love of our mountain home.

Featuring artwork from Patti Dyment, Julia Knowlden, Deborah Foley, Stephen Legault, Mia Riley, and Roland Rollinmud; with special tribute to Chief John Snow. 

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Living, hiking and painting in the Canadian Rockies for over three decades has given Canmore artist Patti Dyment a profound appreciation of, and connection to the mountain landscape. She paints en plein air as much as possible, loving the challenge and the adventure. “I want to share the sensations of outdoor painting in all my landscapes, plein air or studio. I paint relentlessly, I study painting, I teach painting, I think about and dream about painting. It’s a wonderful fascination.”

Deborah Foley was born in the Rockies and spent her youth exploring outside. Her early rock and wildflower collecting perhaps set up her future to be trained in horticulture and environmental studies. A Canmore resident for 6 yrs. she has now integrated years of experience in landscaping and indoor tropical plant design, to be inspired by what our local mountains offer with natural materials to display and complement plants to make living art for our indoor spaces. The abundant textures and colors the mountainscapes are her endless inspiration. Deborah teaches workshops at artsPlace and has a gardening business in the Bow Valley.

Julia Knowlden grew up in Canmore exploring the Rocky Mountains and playing in the woods. She completed her BA in Visual Arts at Vancouver Island University and is a recipient of the Lamphouse Endowment Emerging Artist Bursary. She worked as a landscaper in Nanaimo while attending school and was able to explore a lot of the island. This continued connection to nature has made her a very spiritual person and a passionate environmentalist. Both these aspects are the main influence in her art. After 7 years living in Nanaimo she is back in Canmore to further her art career and influence a greener future in her hometown.

Stephen Legault is a Canmore based award-winning photographer and best-selling author of fourteen books. His recent works of photography are Earth and Sky: Photographs and Stories from Montana and Alberta, and Where Rivers Meet: Photographs and Stories from the Bow Valley and Kananaskis. Stephen has been photographing nature, culture and global communities for thirty-five years and has been an advocate for the environment for nearly as long. He recently was honoured with the Canmore Mayor’s Spotlight for the Arts in 2019. 

Mia Riley is an emerging Canadian ceramic artist whose art practice can be described as nomadic. After graduating from the Alberta College of Art and Design in 2016 her professional journey has taken her to two residencies at Banff Centre, an internship at Harvard’s Ceramics Program and work at Medalta Potteries. In the Bow Valley she works as an arts administrator at artsPlace, ceramics instructor, and maintains a studio practice. She’s passionate about the relationships she’s forged within local, national and international ceramics communities and is an advocate for contemporary craft.  

Sensitized by his Stoney Nakoda First Nation heritage in the Alberta foothills, artist Roland Rollinmud is widely recognized for his interpretations of Nature and First Nations traditional themes. He has a gift of seeing the freedom in his subject matter, whether a pair of eagles soaring overhead, a gander preparing its goslings for first flight, his grandfather providing food for the long winter, or a young fancy dancer moving to heartbeat drums. He shares with the observer his insights into his history, his community and culture through breathtaking glimpses of nature and portraits of chiefs, elders and those who have lived well. When we view his art, we participate in a story. 



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